Monday, October 19, 2015

Hoops vs Frames




 HOOP vs FRAME

Common Embroidery Hoop

You can use a common embroidery hoop, but let me point out, your fabric has got to be drum tight to punch, or your loops will be uneven. When using a common embroidery hoop the fabric tends to loosen up as you work and you will you’ll find you are always pulling the fabric to make it tight. 

Morgan Hoop

Detail of groove on the Morgan Hoop


The Morgan Hoop is engineered to hold the fabric taut. It has a groove in the ring that keeps the fabric in place. They come in a variety of sizes from 5”, 7”, 9”, 10”, 12”, 14”, and 17” diameter.


They also have a lap stand that holds two usable hoops one smaller on larger (varying sizes also) to set on your lap as you work.



I also found there is a floor stand that hold varying hoop sizes. Until I started researching this post. I never knew they existed. 
Isn't it wonderful to be constantly learning.

They are a good investment but perhaps wait until you know if this hobby is the hobby for you.
Many people swear by the Morgan Hoop and never switch to a frame.

 I also want to point out that with any hobby or craft the better the tools the more enjoyable you will find your process.

Grubers rug hooking frame
If you find this is something you will do daily. I suggest a hooker frame. A hooker frame is about 14” x 14” square, and has gripper strips on the edges, with gnarly little teeth on all four sides.  These little teeth can draw blood if you are not careful, sounds like a monster I know, but I love mine. 

My Punching Area
I mounted mine to a small table at a straight back height, for the purpose of good posture. Be careful, holding a hoop can eventually give you arthritis and to help prevent this, a hookers frame is the way to go!

Detail of Pivot on Hooker frame

Let me also add, a frame with a center pivot point affords you the ability to spin your work without removing it.
If you decide you would also like to try rug hooking with wool strips, the hookers frame can be used for this also, so it is dual duty.

There are many frames on the market. You can Google Hookers Frames and make the appropriate choice for you.

There are many choices on the market for hoops and frames. These are just two, they are simply suggestions. Google, shop and enjoy the buying experience. I know at first it seems daunting and you're excited to get started or try new equipment but take the time and do the research. It is all part of the fun of Punch Needle!

Happy Shopping, 
Kate

Next post Fabrics!



3 comments:

  1. All of these posts are very helpful!! I use the Morgan hoop but going to check out the hooking frames. I also would get cramps in my needle hand from gripping too tightly. I wrapped the needle with the self-sticking bandage like they use on your arm after blood work. Really helped with the fatigue in my hand. Great posts!!!

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  2. I have a gripper frame for punching, which I love. I put it on a lazy Susan to turn easily. I only use it at the kitchen table though, as it's a bit cumbersome and sharp! I have a Clover lip hoop, but I don't think it holds the tension like it should. Does the morgan actually hold it drum tight for a good long time? Re adjusting my fabric constantly takes all the fun out.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I have a gripper frame for punching, which I love. I put it on a lazy Susan to turn easily. I only use it at the kitchen table though, as it's a bit cumbersome and sharp! I have a Clover lip hoop, but I don't think it holds the tension like it should. Does the morgan actually hold it drum tight for a good long time? Re adjusting my fabric constantly takes all the fun out.

    ReplyDelete